Backup performance and SMB 3 Multi Channel

In this day and age of exploding data amounts, backup and restore is both increasingly important, and becoming more common and taken for granted. But not all backup “target systems” i.e. the systems to which data is backed up are created equal. Especially so, when the system being backed up is Windows based.

  1.  If your backup target system is based upon CIFS (also sometimes referred to as SMB 1), backup (and restore) is limited to 64kb serial I/O. In other words, the backup/restore software does a 64kb I/O, waits for the I/O to complete, and only then issues the next I/O. In fact it is worse than this. The total payload is limited to 64kb and hence well behaved apps that want to perform I/O in 4MB block size will only use a 60kb payload (data).
  2. If your backup target system is running SMB 2.0, the I/O is 1MB serial, which is certainly an improvement.
  3. If your backup target is SMB 2.1, the I/O is again 1MB, but SMB 2.1 has a server issuing multiple credits which means the client can issue multiple I/Os without having to wait for any one of the I/Os to complete. A typical Windows to Windows flow will show 10 1MB I/Os on the wire at the same time. Note that this is all on a single TCP channel. So the backup/restore speed is significantly higher
  4. Now recall that in most cases, BOTH the system being backed up AND the backup target are servers. For example, you could be backing up a file server or SQL server or Hyper-V server, and of course, the backup target also operates typically as a NAS (file server).  Thus it is very likely that at least one of the two has multiple NICs. If any one (or both) ends of an SMB 3 connection have multiple NICs, and provided these NICs are 10GB RSS capable (which are fairly cheap now), SMB 3 Multi Channel will kick in. SMB 3 Multi Channel establishes multiple TCP channels and engages multiple credits on each TCP channel. So with just 2 TCP channels, you could now have 20MB I/O in flight at any given moment.

In short, if Windows and especially so Windows 2012 is part of your IT environment (or planned environment), make sure your backup target has an upgrade path to SMB 3! And don’t be fooled by just the SMB 3 label! Ask your vendor if it is SMB 3 Multi Channel. The SMB 3 protocol allows a storage device to negotiate SMB 3, but not support SMB 3 Multi Channel!

Wishing you higher backup/restore speeds with SMB 3 Multi Channel!

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: